Cats are like Puzzle Boxes::Tiger

Gliding stealthily through the forests, grasslands, and swamps of Russia and Asia, it is the most iconic and charismatic of the big cats and is the largest species in the felidae family. Like the lion, it is at the top of its food chain – an apex predator. The national animal of India, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and South Korea, it is Panthera tigris. Tiger.

July 29 is
Global/International Tiger Day

Both male and female tigers have strikingly beautiful, striped fur which is skin deep (if shaved, the coat pattern would still be visible); and there are three color variants: golden, stripeless snow white, and white (The Tiger Species Survival Plan has condemned the breeding of white tigers) that now rarely occur in the wild due to the reduction of wild tiger populations, but continue in captive populations. A black tiger is a pseudo-melanistic variant of pigmentation characterized by enlarged stripes which cover a large part of the body of the animal, making it appear melanistic. No two tigers have the same stripes. Like human fingerprints, their stripe patterns are unique to each individual.

All tigers have circular pupils with yellow irises (except the white tiger which typically has blue irises). Like most big cats they ROAR but possess other vocal communications: chuffing, grunting, woofing, snarling, and growling.

The tiger belongs to the genus Panthera with two subspecies: Panthera tigris tigris and Panthera tigris sondaica.

In the last 70 years three species of tiger have gone extinct and all six remaining species are endangered*.

Panthera tigris tigris
Bengal
Also known as the Royal Bengal tiger.
Native to India.
Endangered
Caspian
Extinct as of 2003
Also called the Balkhash tiger, Hyrcanian tiger, Turanian tiger, and the Mazandaran tiger; the Caspian tiger was native to eastern Turkey, northern Iran, Mesopotamia, the Caucasus, Central Asia to northern Afghanistan, and the Xinjang region in western China.
Siberian
Also known as the Amur tiger, Manchurian tiger, Korean tiger, and Ussurian tiger.
Native to the Russian Far East, Northeast China, and possibly North Korea.
Endangered
South China
Also known as the Amoy tiger (in the fur trade).
Native to southern China.
Critically Endangered
Possibly extinct in the wild.
Indochinese
Native to Southeast Asia.
Endangered
Approaching the threshold for being Critically Endangered.
Malayan
Also known as the Southern Indochinese tiger, it is native to Peninsular Malaysia.
Critically Endangered
Panthera tigris sondaica
Javan
Declared extinct in 1994.
Hunted to extinction, the Javan tiger was native to Java.
Bali
Extinct since the 1950s.
The Bali tiger was native to Bali.
Sumatran
Native to Sumatra, the Sumatran tiger is the only surviving tiger in the Sunda Islands.
Critically Endangered

There are also two prehistoric tigers on record: Panthera tigris trinilensis and Panthera tigris acutidens.

*Major reasons for population decline are habitat destruction, habitat fragmentation and poaching for fur and body parts (for use in Chinese pseudo-medicines). Tigers are also victims of human–wildlife conflict, particularly in range countries with a high human population density.

World Tiger Day is in honour of one of the world’s most iconic and endangered big cats. Wild tigers have dropped by more than 95% since the beginning of the 20th Century! There is only 3,900 tigers left in the wild.

Today we remember Sultan a skeletal year-old tiger, who was in critical condition and when anesthetized for tests, he flat-lined in cardiac arrest. The scene transformed into an ER, but he made it back and started breathing. Sultan was one of 13 lucky animals that we rescued from a War Zone in Syria!

WildatLife
7.29.2021

I am not here for your amusement or abuse.

Big Cat Public Safety Act (HR263/S1210)
Big Cat Rescue
Panthera: A Catscape Case Study
National Tiger Conservation Authority
Save the Tiger Fund
IUCN Integrated Tiger Habitat Conservation Programme (2015-2021)
Tiger (wikipedia)
Tiger conservation (wikipedia)

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