A Night of Hekate

Tomorrow we honor the great Dark Goddess, Hekate. Sunset on November 16th marks the beginning of the Night of Hekate. Her origins are Greek but for some Wiccans Hekate has become identified with the Crone stage of the Triple Goddess – the third phase of the Moon Goddess – and is associated with the wintery death of the Earth and the darkside of the Moon.

And we fairies, that do run
By the triple Hecate’s team…

– Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)

Hekate (also spelled Hecate) is the Goddess of witchcraft and magick, crossroads, doors/gates, and thresholds between the living and the dead. As such she is aligned with the Underworld and the spirit realm. Hekate is the Patroness of Witches. Her priestesses (the most famous was Medea) were trained herbalists and well-versed in the use of baneful herbs. Hekate is the witness to all crimes, especially those against women and children, and may be invoked when justice is not forthcoming from other channels. She has the power to grant (or deny) any mortal’s wish and may be petitioned for swift, painless death.

She honours your own choices, though, and will not protect you from yourself
— and yet She is always there for guidance if you choose to look for Her.

– wicca-spirituality.com

Although Hekate has been known to assume the shape of a black cat, she most often manifests as a mature woman or black dog (esp. female). The frog is sacred to her and she is closely aligned with bats, horses, ravens, and lions. Sacred plants: willow, yew, hellebore, garlic, mandrake, belladonna, and hemlock. Hekate’s emblems are the star and crescent moon and her sacred number is 3. Sapphire, moonstone. black tourmaline, onyx, hematite, smokey quartz are her gemstones.

So at sunset tomorrow, light black candles and burn Dragon’s Blood. Serve a feast of eggs, mushrooms, honey, crescent-shaped treats, raisin & currant cakes, red wine, and mead.

Hecate, goddess of the crossroads, hear my cry,
Protect and guard me under your midnight sky.
Hecate Phosphoros “she who brings the light,”
Hecate Trevia bless me with your wisdom tonight.

Ovid writes that Hekate could be conjured up from darkness “with long howls.”

ℳ –

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