Take the time to…

From Animal Outreach of the Motherlode.

When Diego was very sick I thought about what sort of cat I would adopt after he passed on. You see, I cannot imagine myself living without a cat in my life. I knew I preferred a black cat because they are the last ones to be adopted – if they are adopted at all. (When I volunteered at the cat shelter I watched people come in looking for that perfect pet and the black cats were almost always ignored. Sometimes it seemed like they were “invisible”. Just like dogs, cats can get despondent and depressed if not given love and attention.) I also knew I wanted a male because I’ve always had strong ties with male cats. Other than that, I was open to a cat with health problems, an older cat, a blind cat, a cat with three legs…those details never mattered to me. In fact, right before lockdown back in March I had grown very fond of an adult ginger cat named Solar who I nicknamed “Turtle” because he was so shy he wouldn’t come out from underneath his blanket! But I had already fallen in love with Ramses and had welcomed him into my life some months before. (Though I have no doubt that Solar found his fur-ever home.)

We fall in love with who we fall in love with, but if you are looking for the “furry love of your life” please keep your heart open to those who have so much love left to give.

Although penned with dogs in mind, this lovely piece was written by Leave No Paws Behind and can be applied to cats (see Valentino’s story) as well:

Day in and day out they wait, hoping and praying that today will be the day someone will stop at their cage and greet them but sadly no one ever comes. As the days go by, they begin to retreat, grow tired and depressed, they no longer have the strength to rise and finally lose all hope of ever leaving the cold and dismal cage they are now forced to call home. Who are they? They are the “throw a ways”, the ones deemed unadoptable, the sick, the old, the battered and abused, and they are, more oft than not, our wise and caring beloved seniors. When we finally reach them and extend our hand it’s almost as if they can’t believe we are there for them. I mean how could we be, because after all they have been discarded by the only families they ever loved and left behind to die alone and wondering on a cold shelter floor, sick, in pain and frightened.

We are persistent though, we do not leave and we continue to call their names as little by little we watch, through tear stained eyes, as their tails slowly begin to wag and they begin to rise and come towards us. “Yes” we tell them, “we are here for YOU, and no matter how long it takes, we are not leaving until you are ready to leave with us”. We have looked past the lumps, the dirt, the mats, their tender years and the obvious weaknesses in their little bodies and we see only the love, compassion, forgiveness and kindness in their eyes as we reach out to embrace them. We promise them a better life and we tell them they do not have to do tricks, they do not have to charm us, all they need to do is walk alongside of us as we guide them to their freedom. We see the panic in the eyes of the ones who are not steady and too weak to walk, and we assure them we are not leaving without them as we gently reach down and cradle them in our arms.

Blessed Be.
>^..^<

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Gallerie::Animal Outreach (3.17.2020)

Animal Outreach of the Motherlode is a non-profit, no-kill shelter for cats. It’s located just outside of Placerville in Diamond Springs, CA; and I am very happy to be a part of their volunteer staff! The facility is wonderful and the “cattery” is a bright, open space with plenty of spaces to climb to, to hide away for a quick nap, or to just play around in.

Yesterday I watched a prospective Parent pick-up a cat she and her husband were interested in. She just went for it! When I left, the three of them were looking pretty snug together, too. I like to take the “wait and see approach”, preferring the cat come to me – even if we’re talking kittens. However, there are many approaches one can take when introducing yourself to a cat for the very first time; and apart from handling the animal in a rough or aggressive manner, there is no “wrong way”.

Some cats don’t mind being picked-up and handled while others will object to such nonsense, preferring to sit quietly by your side. Cats will normally make their preferences known. Some may hiss or swipe at you. Some may just wriggle out of your grasp. Some will go limp in your arms and purr loudly, their eyes half-closed in a state of pure (purr?) bliss. Here’s what I look for:

Finally, introduce yourself in a calm, confident manner. Cats, like most animals, pick-up on the vibes around them.

These photos were taken from 3.3.2020 to 3.17.2020.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT
“SOLAR”


Achoo, BinkBink, and Babushka are siblings that we born feral and half-starved. They are still shy of new people, but if you take your time with them you’ll find they’re all big, sweet, lovebugs! They would do great adopted together or in pairs and would also tolerate other furry “siblings”. List of attributes noted by their Rescuers:  Playful, goofy, likes being held, comes when called, feisty/instigator, social/outgoing, hunts successfully, uses scratching post.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT
“LI’L BUB”



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Gallerie::Animal Outreach (2.25.2020)

Animal Outreach of the Motherlode is a non-profit, no-kill shelter for cats. It’s located just outside of Placerville in Diamond Springs, CA; and I am very happy to be a part of their volunteer staff! The facility is wonderful and the “cattery” is a bright, open space with plenty of spaces to climb to, to hide away for a quick nap, or to just play around in.

Since I adopted Ramses, I’ve made it a habit to visit the cats in our quarantine area (before hitting The Cattery). This area is where newly-received felines go before being released for adoption. They receive physical evaluations, given shots, microchipped, and neutered/spayed (if necessary). It allows me to get acquainted with cats BEFORE interacting with them in the main area, but Animal Outreach does such a good job of finding Forever Homes that I frequently miss the timeframe between when a cat moves from quarantine to The Cattery before they get adopted!

These photos were taken from 2.4.2020 to 2.25.2020.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

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Gallerie::Animal Outreach (1.28.2020)

Animal Outreach of the Motherlode is a non-profit, no-kill shelter for cats. It’s located just outside of Placerville in Diamond Springs, CA; and I am very happy to be a part of their volunteer staff! The facility is wonderful and the “cattery” is a bright, open space with plenty of spaces to climb to, to hide away for a quick nap, or to just play around in.

Every week I’m introduced to new cats. Our turnaround is great and we see few (if any) returned pets. This is wonderful and speaks to the efforts of every single person working and volunteering here.

KITTENS

IN THE SPOTLIGHT: TIGER

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Gallerie::Animal Outreach (12.30.2019)

Animal Outreach of the Motherlode is a non-profit, no-kill shelter for cats. It’s located just outside of Placerville in Diamond Springs, CA; and I am very happy to be a part of their volunteer staff! The facility is wonderful and the “cattery” is a bright, open space with plenty of spaces to climb to, to hide away for a quick nap, or to just play around in.

Last Tuesday (Christmas Eve) I walked in to the cattery to find it almost empty! Almost every cat and kitten had been adopted. (Still a lot of black cats waiting to find their fur-ever homes.) Also, I was there to witness the adoption of three more kitties before we closed-up shop. (One adult cat was being adopted by a mother and her young son and the cat raced into their carrier the minute they opened its door. We were all LOL!) What a Merry Christmas!

These photos were taken from 11.19.2019 to 12.24.2019.

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